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English - Thursday 21st May 2020

Good morning. Watch my video below and then have a go. Here are the website links you will need:

Information about Limericks

Limerick Generator

Unfortunately, the video does not show me writing my email message at the end, but you can still get the right idea. Here is the limerick generated by the website, then my improved version:

Original:

There was a man named Mike
Who used to ride his bike
But during a break
He made a mistake
What a terrible day for Mike

Improved version:

There was a young man named Michael,
Who used to ride on his bicycle,
While eating a cake,

His leg, he did break,
What a terrible day for Michael.

English - Wednesday 20th May 2020

Fluency and Expression

Today's activity is straightforward. Prepare and perform your poem (the one you wrote yesterday).

1. Watch the video by Renee M. LaTulippe.

2. If you need to, re-write your poem, or improve it.

3. Use Renee's top tips to 'score' your poem so that you decide how to perform each part.

4. Practice your performance - can you learn it by heart?

5. If you would like, make a video of your performance and email it to me.

English - Tuesday 19th May 2020

Rhythm and Rhyme

Write today's date and the Writing L.O: I can use a rhythm and a rhyming pattern in my own poem.

Today's challenge is to write a poem. You have three choices. Choose one of them (Click here for the rhyming dictionary).

Choice One:

Write a poem based on Smiling is Infectious. What other positive things could be infectious? Kindness? Laughing? Cheering? Clapping? Serving? Cooking? Baking? Gardening? Reading? Follow the rhythm and rhyme of Smiling is Infectious. You could use some of the words or lines from the original poem - especially the ending - but make sure that most of it is your own. Here is the original to help you.

Choice Two:

Write a poem based on Be Glad Your Nose is on Your Face. What other things could you be glad about? Here are some ideas that you can use if you want:

Be glad your ears are on your head.

Be glad your feet are on your legs.

Be glad your dog is in his bed.

Be glad your mum is out at work.

Be glad your teachers love to dance.

What other ideas could you use? Use the same rhythm and rhyming pattern as the original poem.

Choice Three: Use another poem of your choice to base your own poem on.

English - Monday 18th May 2020

Good morning.

Here are some more examples of couplets from 'Green Eggs and Ham' by Dr. Seuss:

Do you like green eggs and ham?

I do not like them, Sam-I-Am.
I do not like green eggs and ham.

Would you like them here or there?

I would not like them here or there.
I would not like them anywhere.
I do not like green eggs and ham.
I do not like them, Sam-I-Am.

Would you like them in a house?
Would you like them with a mouse?

I do not like them in a house.
I do not like them with a mouse.
I do not like them here or there.
I do not like them anywhere.
I do not like green eggs and ham.
I do not like them, Sam-I-Am.
 
Would you eat them in a box?
Would you eat them with a fox?

Not in a box. Not with a fox.
Not in a house. Not with a mouse.
I would not eat them here or there.
I would not eat them anywhere.
I would not eat green eggs and ham.
I do not like them, Sam-I-Am.

A couplet is a couple (two) of lines that rhyme with each other.

They usually have the same pulse - or rhythm - as well.

(I hope you are noticing my parenthesis skills.)

Your mission:

1.Write today's date and the Writing L.O: I can have fun with couplets.

2. Think of sets of two words that rhyme (Click here for some ideas - type in any word then click on the 'rhyme' button).

3. Have a go at writing at least five rhyming couplets. They should make sense, and try to give each line the same rhythm. 

4. Choose your best one, and write it in the guestbook below so that we can all see it.

5. There is no 5. You have finished. Well done.

Guestbook

Write your name, and then write your rhyming couplet in the comments box.

Comments (10)
Show Comments
Ahad Ahmed(about a month ago)

i went to the football pitch and i met a witch what was rich.

Ahad Ahmed(about a month ago)

fly=sky zoom=d00m sleep=weep sigh=lie scared=dared

Summayyah Batool(about a month ago)

If you double you'll get into a lot of trouble

zara raja(about a month ago)

I like this poem.

Rehaan khan(about a month ago)

I don't like them in my house I don't like them with a mouse

Mr. Hall(about a month ago)

This is a test, to see if it's true, That writing a comment will appear in your view.

Yusuf Zahid(about a month ago)

I baked a cake It looked like it cooked.

Dawud Ali(about a month ago)

I went to the park and i seen a shark.

Misba Ahmed(about a month ago)

My best couplet is “She was a little tense, That made no sense.”

Zahraa Jamil(about a month ago)

If you don't go to school you're a fool.

English - Friday 15th May 2020

 

Good morning! Hope you are well.

Write today's date and the Reading L.O: I can look for patterns in poems.

  1. Work out what a couplet is.
  2. There is only one couplet in the extract from 'Football Mad' above - it is the first two lines.
  3. Why do you think the other lines have letters next to them? Clue: They are not couplets, but...
  4. Read the two poems below. Choose your favourite.
  5. In your home learning book, write down your ideas about what patterns you think are in your chosen poem.
  6. You can also write any other ideas or thoughts that you have about the poems.

 

 

English - Thursday 14th May 2020

Here are two funny poems for you to enjoy watching:

The first one is written and performed by Spike Milligan, who was a very famous writer, poet, comedian and actor.

 

I'm not sure if this one is actually a poem, but it is funny, so it's worth watching. Our friend Michael Rosen again.

Reading L.O: I can memorise a poem.

Today's activity is really straightforward, but needs some time to make it work. Choose a poem that you like from the ones on this page, and learn it by heart. Try to perform it from memory, without having the words in front of you.

Have fun!

The Rhythm of Life, written by Michael Rosen,

performed by Sufyaan.

Hand on the bridge
feel the rhythm of the train.

Hand on the window
feel the rhythm of the rain.

Hand on your throat
feel the rhythm of your talk.

Hand on your leg
feel the rhythm of your walk.

Hand in the sea
feel the rhythm of the tide.

Hand on your heart
feel the rhythm inside.

Hand on the rhythm
feel the rhythm of the rhyme.

Hand on your life
feel the rhythm of time.
hand on your life
feel the rhythm of time
hand on your life
feel the rhythm of time.

English - Wednesday 13th May 2020

Michael Rosen is our teacher today. Thank you Michael. Here is your activity:

  1. Write the date and Reading L.O: I can use Michael Rosen's tips to help me to perform a poem.
  2. Watch the video below. While watching, note down a word or two for each tip that Michael gives, so that you will remember it later. You can pause the video as you write each bit of advice so that you don't get mixed up.
  3. Choose one of our poems that you would like to practise. You can choose any from this web page.
  4. Use the notes you have made to help you to practise on your own, with your family, in the kitchen, outside, in front of a mirror, sitting down, or standing up - however you like, actually.
  5. If you like, send us a video of your performance for the school website.

Here is Michael Rosen's video about how to perform poems:

Here are some more poems to choose from. If you click on them, they will open big enough to be read:

English - Tuesday 12th May 2020

Good afternoon. Everyone must have been able to work out the meanings of yesterday's tricky words, because no-one asked me about any of them. Well done! (You can still ask if you haven't done it yet).

Today's activities:

  1. Watch the video above.
  2. Look at the poems and videos below.
  3. Choose your favourite.
  4. Practice performing it.
  5. If you would like to, make a video of your performance.

You could send the video to year5teacher@girlingtonprimary.co.uk and we will put it on the website.

Video files can be too large to send in an email message, so to send a video by email, you will need to use a file transfer service like wetransfer.com. It is easy to use and free. You can use wetransfer from a phone, tablet or computer.

The Blind Dog by Clare Bevan

      

The Rhythm of Life (or Hand on the Bridge) by Michael Rosen

Hand on the bridge
feel the rhythm of the train.

Hand on the window
feel the rhythm of the rain.

Hand on your throat
feel the rhythm of your talk.

Hand on your leg
feel the rhythm of your walk.

Hand in the sea
feel the rhythm of the tide.

Hand on your heart
feel the rhythm inside.

Hand on the rhythm
feel the rhythm of the rhyme.

Hand on your life
feel the rhythm of time.
hand on your life
feel the rhythm of time
hand on your life
feel the rhythm of time.

Football Mad by Benjamin Zephaniah

Oh no, bless my soul!
Clever Trevor scored a goal
So he runs up the pitch and wiggles his botty
He gets kissed by ten men all sweaty and snotty
He's waving his fist to the queen who just stares
The lad's going crazy but everyone cheers
Now, whacha doing?
He's chewing the cud
Now, whacha doing?
He's rolling in mud
Now, he is crying
I think he's in pain
Now what's he doing?
He's smiling again

Oh no, bless my soul!
Clever Trevor scored a goal
He's doing gymnastics
He's doing some mime
He's kissing the ground for a very long time
He's now on his back with his feet in the air
And he's gone all religious and stopped for a prayer
Did he pray for the sick?
Did he pray for the poor?
No he prayed for the ball
And he prayed to score
No-one, but no-one can restart the game
Until Trevor has had his moment of fame

Oh no, bless my soul!
Clever Trevor scored a goal
He kicked the ball into the net
How much money will he get?

English - Monday 11th May 2020

Time for something new...

From a Railway Carriage

by

Robert Louis Stevenson

 

Faster than fairies, faster than witches,
Bridges and houses, hedges and ditches;
And charging along like troops in a battle,
All through the meadows the horses and cattle:
All of the sights of the hill and the plain
Fly as thick as driving rain;
And ever again, in the wink of an eye,
Painted stations whistle by.

Here is a child who clambers and scrambles,
All by himself and gathering brambles;
Here is a tramp who stands and gazes;
And there is the green for stringing the daisies!
Here is a cart run away in the road
Lumping along with man and load;
And here is a mill and there is a river:
Each a glimpse and gone for ever!

 

Write today's date and the Reading L.O: I can work out the meanings of words in context.

1. Watch the video and read the poem carefully.

2. Read the poem aloud as if you were in a theatre, performing in front of an audience.

3. Write a list of unfamiliar words down the left hand side of your page.

4. Find out or work out what they mean.

5. Do you have any words left whose meaning you don't know? Email your words to me, and I will publish a list on this page tomorrow.

6. Perform the poem again. Think: Does it seem different now that you know more about the word meanings?